Race for Results: Youth in the Intermountain West

In October 2017, the Annie E. Casey Foundation released an updated Race for Results report (and data), which explores the intersection of children, opportunity, race and immigration. In this infographic essay, the Guinn Center highlights some of the data points, comparing Nevada to its neighbors.

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  • In October 2017, the Annie E. Casey Foundation released its new Race for Results Index, which explores the intersection of kids, race and opportunity. The Race for Results report compares how children are progressing on key milestones across racial and ethnic groups at the national and state levels. In this infographic essay, we present some of the key Race for Results indicators. In addition, we examine the achievement gap between white students and English Language Learners, which comprise 17 percent of the Silver State’s student body.

  • The percentage of children (age 3-5) enrolled in nursery school, preschool, and kindergarten varies across ethnic and racial groups. In general, white and Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander children are enrolled in early childhood education programs at higher rates than Latino/Hispanic and African American children. In California and Nevada, only 14 percent of African American children are enrolled in early childhood programs, which is lower than the national average of 18 percent. In Nevada, only 19 percent of Latino/Hispanic children are enrolled in early education programs.

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • The percentage of fourth graders who met (or exceeded) proficiency levels, as defined by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scale, in reading in 2015 varied significantly across racial and ethnic groups in the Intermountain West. The percentage of white and Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander fourth graders who met proficiency standards was greater than that of African American, Latino, and American Indian fourth graders. In Nevada, only 19 percent of Latino fourth graders and 14 percent of African American fourth graders met proficiency standards.

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results

  • The percentage of eighth graders who demonstrated math proficiency in 2015 (on the NAEP) varied significantly across racial and ethnic groups in the Intermountain West. White and Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander eighth-grade students demonstrated higher rates of proficiency than Latino, African American, and American Indian students. In Nevada, 38 percent of white eighth graders and 48 percent of Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander eighth-graders demonstrated proficiency in math. In contrast, only 16 percent of Latino and 8 percent of African American eighth graders demonstrated proficiency in math.
    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • The high school graduation rate varies across racial and ethnic groups in the Intermountain West. Across all states, the graduation rate is higher among white and Asian/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander students than for African American, Latino, and American Indian students. In Nevada, the graduation rate was 82 for the first two groups, respectively, but just 56 percent for African American students, 67 percent for Latinos, and 58 percent for American Indians.

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation

  • In the next set of slides, we look at the differences in education and economic outcomes between children living in immigrant (foreign-born) families and those living in U.S.-born families.

    The percentage of children living in families at or above 200 percent of poverty varies across the Intermountain West states. (In 2015, 200 percent of the federal poverty level for a family of four (two adults and two children) amounted to $48,072.) In general, the percentage of children growing up in immigrant (foreign-born) families living at or above 200 percent of the federal poverty level is lower than for children living in U.S.-born families, which suggests that children in immigrant families are growing up in lower income households, relative to those in U.S.-born families. Among the Intermountain West states, Nevada and New Mexico have the smallest gap between children growing up in immigrant families and those growing up in U.S.-born families (14 percent). Utah and Colorado have the biggest gaps between these groups (25 percent and 24 percent, respectively).

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation

  • Among the Intermountain West states, New Mexico and Arizona are the states that have the smallest percentage of children in immigrant (foreign-born) families living in low-poverty areas (38 percent and 44 percent, respectively). On the other hand, Colorado and Utah have the highest percentage of children in immigrant families living in low-poverty areas, 67 percent and 69 percent, respectively.

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • Data indicates that children growing up in immigrant (foreign-born) families enroll in nursery school, preschool, and kindergarten at comparable rates to children growing up in U.S.-born families. That said, there are small gaps between the two groups in Arizona and Nevada. Overall, enrollment in preschool and kindergarten is much lower in Nevada than in other states in the Intermountain West. In recent years, political leaders and community and education advocates have worked to expand pre-K and full-day kindergarten in the Silver State.

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • The graduation rate for students who are English-language learners (ELLs) in Nevada is significantly lower than the graduation rate for all students. In 2010-2011, the achievement gap, defined as significant and persistent disparities in academic performance or educational attainment between different groups of students, in graduation rates between ELL students and all students was 33 percentage points. In 2015-2016, the achievement gap narrowed slightly to 31 percentage points. The expansion of ZOOM program funding, which provides funds to direct more intensive support services to English Lanuage Learners at the school site,  to a limited number of middle schools and a high school could provide additional support to help ELL students.

    Source: Nevada Department of Education, Nevada Report Card, various years.
  • The graduation rate of English language-learners (ELLs) in Nevada varies by school district. The graduation rate of ELLs is highest in the Elko County School District (77.3 percent). The graduation rate for ELL students in the Washoe County School District is 34.1 percent, which is the lowest in the Silver State. The gap in graduation rates between students who are English-language learners (ELLs) and all students also varies by school district. The Elko County School District has the smallest gap (7.8 percentage points). Washoe County School District had the biggest gap (42.6 percentage points).

    Source: Nevada Department of Education, Nevada Report Card, various years

  • The percentage of young adults (age 25-29) growing up in immigrant (foreign-born) families that have completed an associate’s degree or higher is lower than young adults growing up in U.S.-born families. Among the Intermountain West states, educational attainment is lowest—both for those in immigrant families and those in U.S.-born families—in Nevada. Only 23 percent of young adults growing up in Nevada’s immigrant households complete an associate’s degree or higher, compared to an average of 37 percent nationwide and 35 percent in California. However, the gap in educational attainment between young adults growing up in immigrant families and those growing up in U.S.-born families is the biggest in Colorado (18 percent) and smallest in New Mexico (5 percent) and Nevada (7 percent).

    Source: KIDS COUNT Data, Race for Results, Annie E. Casey Foundation.

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