Breaking Up Is Hard to Do: CCSD Demographics

Existing demographic disparities should be addressed by the Advisory Committee that is developing a reorganization plan for CCSD. These maps illustrate demographic differences based on factors such as race, socioeconomic status, academic outcomes, school choice, age of facilities, teacher vacancies, and new teachers. Click here for the full report.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPrint this page
  • In 2013-14, Latinos represented 44 percent of the student population in the Clark County School District. This map illustrates that Latino students are concentrated in central, eastern, and northeast Clark County. There are fewer Latino students in the suburban periphery of Las Vegas.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • In 2013-14, African American students represented 12 percent of the student population in the Clark County School District. The highest percentage of African American students is in West and North Las Vegas.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • In 2013-14, White students represented 29 percent of students in CCSD. The largest concentrations of White students are in the southeast and northwest of Clark County. In contrast, the smallest concentration of White students is in central and eastern Clark County.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • In 2013-14, the average Free and Reduced price Lunch (FRL) rate in CCSD was 57 percent. The highest concentration of FRL students is in central and eastern Clark County while the lowest concentration of FRL students is along the suburban periphery of the school district.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • In 2013-14, English Language Learners (ELLs) represented 17 percent of CCSD students. The highest concentration of ELLs is in central and eastern Clark County while the lowest concentration of ELLs is along the suburban periphery of Clark County.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • High and low performing schools are not distributed evenly throughout the district, based on 2013-14 Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) data. There are 57 five-star schools in CCSD and most of these schools are located in suburban areas. There are ten five-star schools in central Clark County, but they are all magnet schools, Career and Technical Academies, or College of Southern Nevada schools. In contrast, CCSD’s 13 one-star schools are all located in central Clark County.

    Data shows shows a positive correlation between the percentage of White and Asian students and NSPF scores, indicating that schools with more White or Asian students tend to have higher academic performance. In contrast, there are negative correlations between the percentage of African American and Latino students and the NSPF, indicating that schools with higher levels of African American and Latino students tend to have lower NSPF scores.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • This map shows substantial differences between graduation rates throughout CCSD. The high schools with the highest graduation rates are concentrated in the suburbs but there are a few schools with high graduation rates in central Clark County. In contrast, all of the schools with low graduation rates are in central Clark County.

    Data shows a positive correlation between the percentage of White and Asian students and high school graduation rates, indicating that schools with more White or Asian students tend to have higher graduation rates. In contrast, there are negative correlations between the percentage of African American and Latino students and high school graduation rates, indicating that schools with higher levels of African American and Latino students tend to have lower graduation rates.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • CCSD offers several school choice options, including magnet schools, select schools, College of Southern Nevada (CSN) High Schools, and charter schools.

    The district currently has 36 magnet schools and Career and Technical Academies (CTAs). These schools provide specialized education options and are used to promote diversity. While there is one CTA in each region of Clark County, most magnet schools are concentrated in the central part of Clark County. The performance of these schools varies. Two magnet schools were recently listed among the top 500 schools in the country by Newsweek and all CTA schools are rated as five-star schools. However, other magnet schools are a mix of two-, three-, four- and five-star schools.

    CCSD began offering a new school choice option in 2015-16 at five high schools called Select Schools. These schools are not magnet schools but provide specialized classes. There are three CSN High School campuses, which allow 11th and 12th grade students to receive dual credit. All three of these schools are rated as five-star schools.

    There are also 39 charter school campuses in Clark County, seven sponsored by CCSD and the remainder sponsored by the State Public Charter School Authority. Historically, charter schools in Clark County serving high need students have generally been low performing while high performing charter schools have not attracted a diverse population

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • As of Oct 1, 2015, CCSD had a total of 764 classroom vacancies. This represents 4 percent of all licensed staff at schools.

    CCSD reports that 77 percent of these vacancies are at schools the District categorizes as at-risk. Analysis of the data shows that the percentage of vacancies in a school is positively correlated with high percentages of minority, FRL, and ELL students but negatively correlated with high percentages of White students. The school with the highest percentage of vacancies is Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary, with 54 percent teacher vacancies. Examining the schools with the ten highest teacher vacancy rates reveals that two are Victory Schools and four are Zoom Schools. The average FRL rate at these schools is 89 percent.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • As of Oct 1, 2015, CCSD had a total of 770 first year teachers who had no experience or only substitute experience. This represents 4 percent of all licensed staff at schools.

    The percentage of new teachers in a school is positively correlated with schools with high percentages of minority, FRL, and ELL students but negatively correlated with high percentages of White students. The school with the highest percentage of teachers without experience is Decker Elementary, with 44 percent new teachers. Examining the ten schools with the highest new teacher rates reveals that three are Victory Schools and one is a Zoom School. The average FRL rate at these ten schools is 82 percent.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

  • CCSD currently has 331 school sites plus administrative buildings. CCSD reports that 50 percent of school buildings are over 20 years old and that in five years, 62 percent of buildings will be over 20 years old. The oldest buildings are in the central part of Clark County and in rural areas. Some buildings in the central area have been replaced by newer facilities, but most new facilities are on the periphery of Clark County. This is a reflection of settlement patterns over time in Clark County.

    Directions: Click on the box in the right corner of the map to view a larger map and see the key. Click on any school to see detailed demographic information.

Get Our Newsletter

  • Enter your email addresses to receive email alerts and our newsletters